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posted this on December 16, 2013 00:55

HD Video Watch Out of the Furnace Online Viooz Bale carries his character across these morose chasms, crafting a portrait of a man whose strength keeps his shoulders level. In the lead-up to the inevitable showdown, Out of the Furnace teeters dangerously close to misery, with Bale’s wounded hero encountering loss and guilt around every corner.


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Watch Out of the Furnace Online Rodney, ever sad-eyed, is another story. He wants no part of the working-class life. An Army veteran about to be sent on his fourth tour in Iraq, Rodney is haunted by his experiences Christian Bale takes an extreme path as his brother’s keeper in the haunting “Out of the Furnace.”

It's also no coincidence Casey Affleck, playing Russell's brother Rodney, is finding it hard to acclimate himself after returning home from his fourth tour in Iraq. As obvious as they may be, these character details add to the film's overall dark tableau, and if you're willing to look beyond initial interpretations and the fact Cooper doesn't set out to explicitly use one theme or another to define the film's narrative trajectory, you'll realize they are more than just surface level cliches.

Shades of Michael Cimino’s Vietnam drama The Deer Hunter permeate Scott Cooper’s Out of the Furnace: images of Pennsylvania steel mills, a PTSD-addled young soldier forced into a world of underground violence, and, well, actual deer hunting.

Were the film to focus solely on the brothers, it would be a solid, if slightly dull, meditation on returning to a mundane existence after a life of extremes. Cooper’s ambitions go beyond that, and it’s not long before Rodney crosses paths with Harlan DeGroat (Woody Harrelson), a lollipop-chomping, heroin-addicted hillbilly who runs a criminal empire amid the dilapidated trailers of the New Jersey mountains.

These performances, along with the naturalistic and subdued direction, elevate the film above a cut-and-dry tale of retribution. By focusing on the anguish of characters forced to drastic measures, Cooper spins a sophisticated tale that never resorts to melodrama.

I can't entirely come to a decision as to Cooper's explicit intention with this narrative, but my interpretation of it is to say he's deftly brought to life a rather simple story and layered it with a multitude of themes that may seem simple on the surface, but contribute to an otherwise philosophically-complex story by the film's end.

It's no coincidence the film is set in Braddock, PA or that Christian Bale, playing Russell Baze, is a steel mill worker like his father before him, as he faces the likely possibility the mill will be shut down.

Such are the performances throughout, Bale the quiet, reliable type that actually runs into his own issues with the law while Affleck never takes his character's PTSD to cliched levels. A lot about this film is handled with great subtlety and it's one of the story's finer aspects.

Director Scott Cooper (“Crazy Heart”) presents familiar themes, but takes them in unpredictable directions. Set among the working class of a rusting Pennsylvania steel town, the story initially shows Russell enjoying his romance with Lena (Zoe Saldana), despite his dead-end job at the mill. He’s a dutiful son, sweetly loving to his terminally ill father (Bingo O’Malley).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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