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¤Must_\\ Watch Bad Grandpa Online Free Megashare 2013 Movie - Download Bad Grandpa

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posted this on December 16, 2013 01:08

Free 2013 Watch Bad Grandpa Online Movie Full HD When Johnny Knoxville and his partners in crime reveal their true intentions to people at strip clubs, diners, funeral parlors, convenience stores and beauty pageants, everyone is good-humored about it because they know they'll be in the movie. Fifteen minutes of fame is worth a lot more than a few seconds of hot-headed retaliation, no matter how embarrassing those 15 minutes may be. The closing credit scenes of "Bad Grandpa" made me think of Funt's handiwork.

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Free 2013 Watch Bad Grandpa Online Movie Full I'm not a big fan of practical jokes, but I watched "Candid Camera" every week in the hopes that someone would punch Allen Funt in the face. It never happened, and "Bad Grandpa"'s post-credits outtakes told me why.  If Candid Camera creator Allen Funt was TV's practical joke king, Knoxville has become cinema's. He sees humor not in the punchline, but the reaction to it. It follows in the footsteps of Sacha Baron Cohen's plot-driven interactions with the common man and woman, people who are completely oblivious that they're in a movie.

It's older than you think. In 1948, Allen Funt brought his radio program, "Candid Microphone" to that shiny new invention called television. Rechristened "Candid Camera," Funt's show specialized in playing tricks on regular people, from making their furniture do strange things to having former President Harry Truman walk up and ask them the time. His victims were always let off the hook with the show's catchphrase: "Smile, you're on Candid Camera!" The show ran, on and off, until 2004. Funt also directed an X-rated prank film called "What Do You Say to a Naked Lady?" which preceded the naughtiness and sexual humor of "Bad Grandpa" by 43 years.

By itself, the joke would barely support a 22-minute Jackass TV episode. But longtime Jackass director Jeff Tremaine, working with a script co-written by auteur filmmaker Spike Jonze (Being John Malkovich, Adaptation), takes a daring approach to the public gags, overlaying them with the template of a plot.

As we learn through Grandpa's account to horrified passersby, the old man is ready to party like it's 1899 after the death of his henpecking wife Ellie (Catherine Keener). Problem is, Irving's daughter is headed to jail for drugs, forcing him to take a cross-country trip to drop 8-year-old Billy (Jackson Nicoll) off with his ne'er-do-well toker son-in-law, Chuck (Zia Harris). That still could be fodder for a collection of random sketches, the format of the previous three Jackass films. Yet Knoxville and Nicoll stay so in character throughout Grandpa that, by film's end, our heroes have mustered some dramatic tension.

Of course, laughs still rule Knoxville's world, and he finds doozies here, beginning with his wife's memorial service before a handful of funeral home employees and onlookers suckered into the program.

As you'd expect, Grandpa can't help but stir trouble, leading to the casket's collapse. What you might not expect is Knoxville's crass charm in convincing attendees to join in a rousing chorus of I've Got the Joy Joy Joy Joy — while the corpse rests on the floor.

Unlike the "Jackass" TV show or its resulting movies, "Bad Grandpa" combines Knoxville's penchant for crazy stunts with a scripted story about a dirty old man and his precocious kid. Knoxville plays Irving Zisman, the randy 86-year old grandfather of Billy (Jackson Nicholl). Irving's wife of 46 years has died, and as "Bad Grandpa" opens, he reacts with a laugh and proclamation of freedom. But at the funeral of Mrs. Zisman, Billy's Mom pawns him off on his granddad. The kid will cramp Irving's lothario style ("I may be too old to stir the gravy," he tells one woman, "but I can still lick the spoon."), so a standard issue movie road trip develops. Zisman will bring Billy to his father, then resume his quest to find the next "piece of tail."

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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